the elevator pitch

IMG_0361“we’re not in the motion-picture-business. we’re in the E-motion-picture-business”, director/actor ron howard said.

at film school this word “emotion(s)” is being used a lot. it’s so weird for me, being used to hear in my business in germany that emotions are the one thing that should be controlled, not being shown at any time. (of course advertising is about emotions, too, but not the business part i have been involved with most of the time).
listening to our teachers preaching to never forget the emotions in our ideas, is such a satisfaction me. every such moment is a confirmation for the decision i took 9-10 months ago.
i am being taught again, to never forget that there is a poetic part of life, and that it IS important.

you shouldn’t lack strategic talent though. to sell your film idea to a producer successfully, we’ve been told about the so-called: “elevator pitch”. the logline of your idea/story shouldn’t be longer than a 27-words sentence – just as much you need during an elevator ride with a producer you might meet there by coincidence and you want to pitch your idea to.
knowing that many producers have already read a billion stories and are therefore hard to convince to read your script, this is a good way to condense your idea down in the most brief way possible. it should intice somebody to read your screenplay. at the same time it’s a good test for the marketability of it.

read the following logline of a very well-known movie (1993) and guess which one it is:
“an egotistical tv personality must relive the same day in small town Punxsutancy and be denied the girl of his dreams unless he can become more selfless”.

and one that i tried to write myself about one of my favorite films:
“a faded movie star feels lost in another continent during a commercial job and falls into depression unless he forms an unlikely bond with a neglected young woman.”

so? any ideas what movies these are? please write your guesses in the comment area!

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